From Flanders Field but dont touch the poppies or theyll die – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas Artwork

This is a repost, but updated.

Title: From Flanders Field, but don’t touch the poppies or they’ll die – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas 

Source: From Flanders Field but dont touch the poppies or theyll die – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas Artwork

I originally painted this with acrylic and wanted to give it a different digital look. I used digital artistry to give it a metal look. One of the most beloved poem about poppies was Flanders Field, written by John McCrae written about World War I. 

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae – 1872-1918

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
        In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe: 
To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high. 
    If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
        In Flanders fields.

The poem was rejected by several publications but finally published in December 1915 by Punch. It became the poem of the war during the war. It spoke to the people of Britain, its dominions and allies in a profound way. When America joined the war, and American casualties began to roll in, it spoke to Americans as well.

An American schoolteacher, Moina Michael in 1920 convinced the Georgia Department of the American Legion to make the poppy the remembrance flower of the war. It was later accepted by the American Legion at its annual convention shortly thereafter. Attending the convention was a Frenchwoman, Anna Guerin, who promoted the idea the poppy as a remembrance flower. She traveled to Australia, New Zealand, Canada and finally Great Britain to promote the idea.

Thanks for looking!

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