Mormon Row Cabin Jackson Wyoming – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

 

Mormon Row Cabin Jackson Wyoming – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Mormon Row Cabin Jackson Wyoming – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Pretty In Peach Historic Stucco House on Mormon Row – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Pretty In Peach Historic Stucco House on Mormon Row – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Pretty In Peach Historic Stucco House on Mormon Row – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Settlement home called the Peach House nestled within Aspen trees located at Mormon Row located in Jackson, WY near the Grand Teton National Park. Photograph transformed digitally.

John Moulton Homestead at Mormon Row. The story is… “While John’s wife, Bartha, was in the hospital, John wanted to do something special to commemorate her homecoming,” the Historical Society recounts on its website. “He knew that she had wanted to repaint the house, and due to a small mix-up, chose the salmon pink color. When Bartha came home, she despised the color but so loved the sentiment behind it, that it was never changed.”

Mormon Row was settled in the late 1890s by Mormons from the Salt Lake region. The town was formerly known as the town Grovont. and was established by 27 homesteaders. The Homestead Act of 1862, granted land ownership to any person willing to build a house and cultivate the area for five years. The community was able to establish a presence in the area east of Blacktail Butte, below the Grand Tetons. Settlers secured 27 homesteads they built close together to share labor and community.

Despite the harsh conditions of Jackson Hole, WY. These hardy settlers dug ditches by hand and with teams of horses, building an intricate network of levees and dikes to funnel water from central ditches to their fields between 1896 and 1937. Water still flows in some of these ditches. Settlers dug miles of ditches to bring water from the Gros Ventre River to their fields. In the winters, these ditches would freeze so families traveled to the river with buckets to gather water. It wasn’t until 1927 that the Kelly Warm Spring cooled and offered a dependable water source to the residents. Families grew hay and ninety-day-oats. These were one of the limited crops that were able to survive the short growing season and harsh conditions of the Jackson Hole area. Families sustained themselves by owning cows, whose milk and meat provided food, as well as horses to till the fields

The town of Grovont also contained several ranches, homes, a church, and a school. The church, built in 1916, played a critical role in the community serving as a social stage for all races and religions, regardless of faith. Although the building was moved to Wilson, it is marked at Mormon Row by fence posts, two cottonwoods, and a spruce tree.

In the mid-1900s, Mormon Row was acquired to expand Grand Teton National Park and in 1997 the district was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Below are descriptions of some of the barns that still stand today, offering the same feeling and setting of the district as it was 100 years

What Do You Believe – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

What Do You Believe – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: What Do You Believe – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Protest Poster. Created since there was so much discrepancy with news media during Covid-19. The message is: Believe only what you see since you cant always believe what you hear.

Protest art is the creative works produced by activists and social movements. It is a means of communication to arouse the emotions and persuade a selected audience of citizens to make social changes. Protest art may increase the climate of tension and create new opportunities to dissent. Since art, unlike other forms of dissent, take few financial resources, less financially able groups and parties can rely more on performance art and street art as an affordable tactic.

Protest art is a tool to form social consciousness, create networks, operate accessibly to those in need, and a cost-effective means of communication. Social movements produce such works as the signs, banners, posters, and other printed materials used to convey a particular cause or message, sometimes used as a part of demonstrations. The various symbols or sayings sometimes become adopted as a long-term defining social movement icons.

Protest art also includes (but is not limited to) performance, site-specific installations, graffiti and street art, and crosses the boundaries of Visual arts genres, media, and disciplines. While One does not need extensive knowledge of art to create or embrace social movement. Protest artists frequently bypass the art-world institutions and commercial gallery system in an attempt to reach a wider audience.

Elk Bull Photo – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Elk Bull Photo – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Elk Bull Photo – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Male elk are called bulls and females are called cows. Average size varies, but elk are one of the largest species in the deer family. Mature bull elk typically weigh 600-1,000 pounds. Elk have a two-tone coat with a light-brown body that transitions into a much darker mane. They also have a distinctive white patch of fur on their rump. Elk also have very large and impressive antlers. A mature bull Yellowstone elk normally has six and sometimes seven (or more) tines on each antler.

Bison Headshot – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Bison Headshot – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Bison Headshot – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Bison Silhouette – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Bison Silhouette – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Bison Silhouette – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Canadian Geese – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Canadian Geese – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts – Canvas

Source: Canadian Geese – Aurelia Schanzenbacher Sisters Fine Arts Print

Canadian geese photo taken in Yellowstone National Park. This was put through digital artistry.
The Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is a large wild goose with a black head and neck, white cheeks, white under its chin, and a brown body. It is native to the arctic and temperate regions of North America, and its migration occasionally reaches across the Atlantic to northern Europe. It has been introduced to the United Kingdom, Ireland, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, New Zealand, Japan, Chile, Argentina and the Falkland Islands. Like most geese, the Canada goose is primarily herbivorous and normally migratory; it tends to be found on or close to fresh water.

Extremely adept at living in human-altered areas, Canada geese have established breeding colonies in urban and cultivated habitats, which provide food and few natural predators. The success of this common park species has led to its often being considered a pest species because of its excrement, its depredation of crops, its noise, its aggressive territorial behavior toward both humans and other animals, and its habit of stalking and begging for food.